Friday, December 03, 2004

black budgets & satellites (update)

vr
"Tucked inside Congress' new blueprint for U.S. intelligence spending is a highly classified and expensive spy program that drew exceptional criticism from leading Democrats.

In an unusually public rebuke of a secret government project, Sen. Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia, the senior Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, complained Wednesday that the program was ``totally unjustified and very, very wasteful and dangerous to the national security.'' He called the program ``stunningly expensive.''

Rockefeller and three other Democratic senators -- Richard Durbin of Illinois, Carl Levin of Michigan and Ron Wyden of Oregon -- refused to sign the congressional compromise negotiated by others in the House and Senate that provides for future U.S. intelligence activities."

-from an article by ted bridis and the associated press from the new york times, 9 dec 2004

mystery spy project
and see update:
mystery spy project update


seems that the black budget for reckless military hardware and spy programs continues to grow. a round of applause for these senators with the courage to speak out against america's development of an expensive and seemingly unnecessary new satellite system.
whatever happened to the idea of the peaceful development of space? do we really need a new arms race?

2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Wonder what Specialist Thomas Wilson would say to that. I just don't undestand how the military can support these people!

jw

12:54 PM  
Blogger gregg chadwick said...

-thomas wilson is but one of a multitude of americans forced to dig through broken glass and rusted steel looking for a way to up-armor their lives as the future is squandered. i'm listening to michael mcdermott's "arm yourself" as i write this... he sings of "a crescent moon goodbye" and lord knows we have had too many.

7:02 PM  

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