Monday, January 25, 2010

Michael Gordon's "Accidental Music Lesson" in the New York Times

Gotham - mvt 1, excerpt from Bill Morrison on Vimeo.


Excerpt from “Gotham”: film by Bill Morrison, music by Michael Gordon.

Composer Michael Gordon has an inspiring piece on art, family, home, and music in today's online New York Times:

Once, at my last piano lesson before heading off for vacation, I asked Mrs. Kutzen what her plans were for the summer. Her reply: “Michael, musicians don’t take vacations.” I filed this line away in a special part of my brain, an informal collection of “accidental music lessons.” My interpretation of Mrs. Kutzen’s words has changed through the years, like a Talmudic discourse that is argued from different points of view:

1. Musicians just don’t ever feel quite right going an extended period of time without playing their instrument.

2. Music isn’t a job that you punch in and out of. It’s an obsession, a calling and your purpose in life.

3. Musicians don’t make a lot of money and you’re not going to be able to afford a vacation anyway.

-January 25, 2010, 5:54 PM
The Accidental Music Lesson
By Michael Gordon for the New York Times


Gotham - mvt 2, excerpt from Bill Morrison on Vimeo.


Excerpt from “Gotham”: film by Bill Morrison, music by Michael Gordon.

More at:
Michael Gordon's "Accidental Music Lesson"

1 comment:

Naumadd said...

I know precisely what he means. I put far too many hours into writing which leaves me feeling fairly fatigued most of the time. Rest seems the prudent thing but, if I take more than a day or two off from my work, I feel like I can't get any air and may choke to death. Turns out, it's an apt metaphor - the chronically curious must be the obsessively creative. Breath in the world, breath out one's impressions and vision of it or suffocate. It really is a matter of life and death.